Colorado CRS 18-12-214.

 

Authority granted by permit - carrying restrictions

This is not legal advice, just an attempt to simplify some of the language.

(1) (a) A permit to carry a concealed handgun authorizes the permittee to carry a concealed handgun in all areas of the state, except as specifically limited in this section. A permit does not authorize the permittee to use a handgun in a manner that would violate a provision of state law. A local government does not have authority to adopt or enforce an ordinance or resolution that would conflict with any provision of this part 2.

So, in this section we have permission to carry any place in the state (including public transportation) as long as that place doesn't fall into one of the categories below. It also says the use must be lawful and that local (cities,  towns, etc.) can't enforce their own conflicting laws.

(b) A peace officer may temporarily disarm a permittee, incident to a lawful stop of the permittee. The peace officer shall return the handgun to the permittee prior to discharging the permittee from the scene.

Simply put, if an officer asks you to surrender your handgun, or takes it from you, he/she is within his/her rights under the law. You can argue if the stop was lawful later. Don't be that person that got shot because they had a gun and refused to comply with the officers instructions.

(2) A permit issued pursuant to this part 2 does not authorize a person to carry a concealed handgun into a place where the carrying of firearms is prohibited by federal law.

This is a great punt. You as the permit holder must know not only Colorado law but you must also keep abreast of federal law as well. Best to play it safe and not carry concealed on any federal property or office without getting permission first.

(3) A permit issued pursuant to this part 2 does not authorize a person to carry a concealed handgun onto the real property, or into any improvements erected thereon, of a public elementary, middle, junior high, or high school; except that:

Pretty straight forward, but notice this says public school. Private schools may set their own restrictions under (5).

(a) A permittee may have a handgun on the real property of the public school so long as the handgun remains in his or her vehicle and, if the permittee is not in the vehicle, the handgun is in a compartment within the vehicle and the vehicle is locked;

The gun can't leave the car, period...end of story. If you get out to help your child get in and someone calls the cops because they saw your gun...you have committed a crime.

(b) A permittee who is employed or retained by contract by a school district or charter school as a school security officer may carry a concealed handgun onto the real property, or into any improvement erected thereon, of a public elementary, middle, junior high, or high school while the permittee is on duty;

On duty security staff may carry a concealed hand gun.

(c) A permittee may carry a concealed handgun on undeveloped real property owned by a school district that is used for hunting or other shooting sports.

You can carry on undeveloped school property while hunting. Just don't cross developed school property to get there.

(4) A permit issued pursuant to this part 2 does not authorize a person to carry a concealed handgun into a public building at which:

(a) Security personnel and electronic weapons screening devices are permanently in place at each entrance to the building;

(b) Security personnel electronically screen each person who enters the building to determine whether the person is carrying a weapon of any kind; and

(c) Security personnel require each person who is carrying a weapon of any kind to leave the weapon in possession of security personnel while the person is in the building.

So, you go to the Sheriff's office and can't carry there because they have security screening, permanently installed screening devices and a way to secure your hand gun while you are in the building.

In theory, if a public building does not conform to this and is not otherwise a restricted area then you may carry concealed in that building. The reality is that often times you'll find signs to the contrary. Obey them, take care of business and then contact the agency and get it addressed. Some agencies refuse until they are sued.

(5) Nothing in this part 2 shall be construed to limit, restrict, or prohibit in any manner the existing rights of a private property owner, private tenant, private employer, or private business entity.

This says that none of these restrictions trump the decision of a private property owner to prohibit concealed carry on his/her property.

(6) The provisions of this section apply to temporary emergency permits issued pursuant to section 18-12-209.